As a filmmaker, understanding how to find work, land bigger and better projects, and actually make a living while freelancing is as important (if not more) than learning the craft itself. No one knows that better than today’s guest - Cole Walliser - an acclaimed commercial and music video Director based in Los Angeles, who went from shooting skateboarding videos with friends to directing content for Katy Perry, Pink, Miley Cyrus, and countless other artists and brands.

Over the course of the interview, Cole shares his unique journey as a filmmaker, outlining each step he took to develop his passion for filmmaking into a thriving and sustainable career. Topics covered include: how to get started as a director, whether or not owning gear is essential, how to know when to take unpaid work, landing large clients, working with the DGA, the importance of social media, and much more.

To check out more of Cole’s work, use the links below:

www.colewalliser.com

www.instagram.com/colewalliser

www.youtube.com/ColeWalliser

www.twitter.com/colione

And for more content like this visit www.noamkroll.com 

00:0000:00

The film festival submission process can be extremely daunting for filmmakers, especially those that have no experience on the festival circuit. Many filmmakers neglect to understand what festivals are truly looking for with their submissions, and don’t give themselves the best chance possible to get programmed.

In today’s episode, Karolyne Sosa, Programming Director for DTLAFF, sheds light on the programming process - sharing inside info from behind the scenes, outlining exactly what goes into creating a festival slate. Topics discussed include: programming blind submissions vs. curated films, optimizing communication with festivals, what the programming process entails, how to pre-market your work, what happens after getting programmed, and much more.

To submit your film for free to DTLAFF, be one of the first 10 listeners to e-mail: info@DTLAFF.com with the subject: DTLAFF & Noam Kroll

For more content like this visit www.noamkroll.com

00:0000:00

Micro-budget filmmakers are often far more focused on the creative aspects of their projects than the business side. This can pose challenges for those aiming to raise a substantial budget for their films, as many don’t know where to start, or simply assume crowdfunding is their only option.

In today’s episode, we break down the basics of each of the major financing options indie filmmakers have at their disposal. Topics covered include: crowdfunding, private equity, foreign pre-sales, distributor financing, and more. We also discuss how to identify which financing model is most relevant for any given film, based on the goals and objectives of the filmmakers behind the project.

For more content like this visit www.noamkroll.com

00:0000:00

Many filmmakers end up editing their own feature films, as low budget projects typically call for everyone on board (including the director) to wear many hats. These same filmmakers are also usually left with the responsibility of cutting their own trailers too, which can be far more challenging than feature edit itself.

Trailer editing really is its own art form. Large scale feature films are almost always sent to dedicated trailer houses/trailer editors who specialize in this area, as cutting an effective promo piece takes an entirely different set of skills. Independent and micro-budget films don't have this luxury, so lower budget directors/editors must develop a new skill set if they want to deliver an effective trailer that truly does their film justice.

In this episode, we explore several key considerations on this topic - from the importance of priotizing the audio bed, to avoiding the temptation of telling the whole story in just 2 minutes, and much more.

For more content like this, or to check out the trailer for SHADOWS ON THE ROAD visit www.noamkroll.com

00:0000:00

As expected, NAB 2018 brought us some of the most exciting camera and gear announcements of the year so far, and there is a whole lot to unpack. While Blackmagic once again stole the show with their Pocket Cinema Camera 4K, many other cameras - such as the Sony FS5 II, Canon C700 FF, Fuji X-H1, and Kinefinity MAVO have been making waves too. Over the course of the episode, we delve into these cameras at length, exploring their core features, strengths, and shortcomings.

We also discuss the merits of NAB, who the conference is really for, how to get the most out of it, and whether it’s worth attending for filmmakers that have never been. All this and much more on today’s show!

For more content like this visit www.noamkroll.com

00:0000:00

On today's show we are joined by none other than Alex Ferrari, a micro-budget filmmaker and true hustler - known widely for his popular filmmaking podcast Indie Film Hustle. After 20 years in the film business, Alex turned to micro-budget filmmaking as a means to take control over his own destiny and bring his feature narrative projects to life once and for all. This has culminated in the creation of two feature films over the past two years: This Is Meg, and On The Corner Of Ego And Desire.

Over the course of the interview, Alex uses his film Meg as a case study, outlining the exact steps he took to get the film made, premiere at Cinequest, and eventually license the film to Hulu. Topics covered include: Working from a scriptment, casting known actors, handling post-production on your own, navigating the festival circuit, finding distribution on major VOD platforms, and much more.

Links from the show:

Bulletproof Script Coverage: http://www.covermyscreenplay.com 
 
Indie Film Huslte: https://indiefilmhustle.com 
IFH Podcast: IFH Podcast
 
On the Corner of Ego and Desire: http://www.egoanddesirefilm.com
 
And for more content like this, visit http://www.noamkroll.com
00:0000:00

Most filmmakers have a laundry list of excuses for why they're not making their film - They don’t have enough money, can’t find good actors, or don’t have access to the right camera package. But more often than not, these excuses are self-imposed, and it's the filmmaker themself that is holding the project back, often unwittingly creating hurdles that will prevent them from ever making thier movie.

Why is this the case, though? Why do so many filmmakers create obstacles for themselves, or believe that making a feature film is an impossible feat, when it is easier now than ever before? The reason is simple: They are afraid to fail. Whether they realize it or not, the excuses they are making for themselves are all rooted in a fear of failure, and that's what today's episode is all about. We look at some of the ways fear of failure can manifest during the creative process, the detriment it can have on any film project, and how to avoid it entirely so that we can all focus on the one thing that really matters - making the best work possible.

For more content like this visit www.noamkroll.com

00:0000:00

Back in episode 35, Jamie Jung was on the show to discuss his experience acting in a $7000 feature film, funded by Robert Rodriguez for his “Rebel Without A Crew” series. Today, Jamie is back on this show with his director Alejandro Montoya Marin who, as a one-man-band, directed and produced his feature film in just 14 days.

Over the course of the interview, Jamie and Alejandro not only speak to what they learned from Robert Rodriguez as acted as a mentor for this film, but also share their words of wisdom on micro-budget filmmaking from a high-level. Topics covered include: Navigating a career as an indie filmmaker, the importance of self-generated content, working in a market outside of NY or LA, tips and techniques for working as a one person crew, and much more.

Links from the show:

http://www.go90.com

http://www.elreynetwork.com

http://www.alejandromontoyamarin.com

http://www.jamiehjung.com

For more content like this visit www.noamkroll.com

00:0000:00

Arguably the most important element to get right when producing any micro-budget film is crew size. When crew size gets out of hand, production is bound to lose efficiency and momentum, which equates to the film's limited budget getting burned through in record time.

While many filmmakers and first time directors aim to work with larger crews that offer a more “traditional” setup for a feature film, there’s an argument to be made that less is more - especially on no-budget or ultra-low budget productions. In today’s episode, we explore this at length by outlining the benefits and realities of working with a 2 person crew, and comparing it to a more standardized 15 - 25 person crew commonly found on other indie productions. We look at how a smaller crew allows for more effective guerilla shooting, a more rapid pace on set, and potentially greater creative results. All this and much more on today’s episode.

For more content like this visit www.noamkroll.com

00:0000:00

It’s been said that locations can play as great a role in a film as any character, and no one understands that more than today’s guest. Brian L. Tan is an action filmmaker and entrepreneur who worked at Dreamworks, Paramount, and Digital Domain, before eventually launching the prominent location booking service Wrapal. He’s also known for appearing on the most recent season of HBO’s Project Greenlight.

In this episode, Brian shares his words of wisdom on the location process, explaining how to save money when working with location owners, how to effectively scout locations for a guerrilla style shoot, and the most critical elements to consider when booking any location. Pulling from his experiences as a self made filmmaker, Brian also shares loads of invaluable tactical advice for up and coming directors, speaking to the importance of building a solid team of collaborators, getting your work noticed online, and much more.

Links from the episode:

www.wrapal.com

www.blttavo.com

www.instagram.com/blttavo

www.twitter.com/blttavo

www.facebook.com/bltan

www.youtube.com/user/blttavo/videos

www.vimeo.com/iconicfilm

For more content like this visit www.noamkroll.com

00:0000:00

Load more