It’s always so inspiring to hear about filmmakers that are truly able to make something from nothing, and that’s very much the case with our guest today - Rebecca Weaver. With a production budget of only $11,000 and a crew of only 2 (Rebecca and her boyfriend, Chris), the filmmaking duo was able to pull off a successful feature film that spanned several months of production and later went on to tour the festival circuit.

In the true spirit of micro-budget filmmaking, Rebecca not only wrote and directed the feature, but also starred in it. Throughout the interview, she discusses how she was able to juggle so many different roles without sacrificing her vision, and what she ultimately learned from the process as a whole. She also shares her experience with film festivals, outlining how she was able to successfully get her feature - June Falling Down - accepted into 15 different festivals, picking up several awards along the way.

Links from the episode can be found below:

junefallingdown.com

twitter.com/junefallingdown

twitter.com/beccarooweaver

instagram.com/junefallingdown

instagram.com/beccarooweaver

And be sure to visit noamkroll.com for more content like this!

 

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How do you make a feature film for just $8000 in 13 days? For writer/director Joe Baddon and actress Linnea Gregg, it was all about leveraging resources, maximizing creativity, and avoiding perfectionism.

With no experience directing narrative content in the past, Joe Badon was able to pull the trigger on his first feature - The God Inside My Ear - by thinking outside of the box and surrounding himself with a team of talented filmmakers and artists. One of these artists was Linnea Gregg, who brought her expertise as a theater actor to the table, ultimately helping production reach the finish line in record time.

Over the course of this interview, Joe and Linnea outline what it takes to pull off film without sacrificing quality, why shooting in a studio environment is a great option no matter what your budget may be, and the crucial importance of surrounding yourself with the right team.

Links from the show:

www.thegodinsidemyear.com

www.joebaddon.blogspot.com

www.instagram.com/linneagregg

And for more content like this visit www.noamkroll.com

 

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Micro-budget filmmakers often put a tremendous amount of effort into production and post, but tend to lose steam when it comes time to distribute their work. Unfortunately, this means that many great films never find an audience, and end up collecting dust on a shelf rather than generating income for the filmmakers behind the project.

On today’s episode, Noam interviews Liz Manashil, the talented filmmaker behind the micro-budget feature film Bread and Butter. Liz is also the manager of the Creative Distribution Initiative at Sundance Institute, which has given her a tremendous amount of insight on the distribution process, especially with regards to micro-budget productions. Over the course of the interview, Liz shares her wealth of knowledge on all things distribution, sheds light on her strategy with her own feature film, and outlines Sundance’s Creative Distribution Initiative - explaining how she plans to use it to champion micro budget productions.

You can learn more about Liz on her website at www.lizmanashil.com

And for more content like this visit www.noamkroll.com

 

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For the first time on the podcast, Noam takes listener questions that were sent in via e-mail and Twitter from micro-budget filmmakers looking for advice. Topics covered includes: the creative process, career advice, working with unprepared actors, abandoning projects and much more.

If you would like to have your question answered on a future episode, be sure to ask Noam via twitter at www.twitter.com/noamkroll

And for more content like this visit www.noamkroll.com

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For the past two years Timothy Plain and Alrik Bursell have interviewed countless filmmakers on their popular podcast - Making Movies Is Hard. Over the course of these interviews the filmmaking duo have benefitted from a tremendous amount of professional insight covering every stage of the process from conception to distribution.

In today's episode, Timothy and Alrik generously share some of the most valuable lessons they have learned along the way, both as hosts of the MMIH podcast and as filmmakers in their own right. Topics covered include the state of independent/micro-budget film today, breaking in to the business, the writing process, fundraising/budget considerations and much more.

You can check out more of Timothy and Alrik's material using the links below:

http://www.makingmoviesishard.com

https://twitter.com/TimothyPlain

https://twitter.com/AlrikB

And for more content like this be sure to visit www.noamkroll.com

 

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While most studio level feature films take many years to produce, micro-budget films often come together far more quickly as there is less red tape involved at every stage. In fact, some filmmakers have realized their visions in as little as 6 months, which is virtually unheard of in filmmaking at other budget levels.

In this episode, Noam outlines his optimal 6 month feature film schedule - from concept to finished product - and explains how this type of time constraint can benefit the creative process. He walks listeners through every stage, detailing how much time should be allocated to writing, pre-production, production, and post, in order to execute the strongest possible final product in as little time as possible.

For more content like this visit www.noamkroll.com

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Micro-budget films have increased in technical quality by leaps and bounds over the past decade, but many still fail to reach an audience as a result of underdeveloped stories and screenplays. This has ultimately become the achilles heel for so many micro-budget filmmakers, which is why it’s so imperative that every filmmaker, regardless of budget, places an equal weight on the writing process.

In today’s episode, Noam interviews Whitney Davis - a literary manager who started in this business as a TV writer (represented by William Morris Agency), and later moved into script consulting and management. Over the course of this interview, Whitney pulls from her diverse background as a writer, consultant, and manager to share invaluable advice on screenwriting that is universally applicable to any filmmaker looking to strengthen their work.

To learn more about Whitney, visit her website here: www.whitneydavisliterary.com

For more content like this visit www.noamkroll.com

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Story structure is the backbone of just about every film, and a true mastery of stucture is critical to the success of any filmmaker. Many narrative features falter as a result of poor structure, and unfortunately this is true even of films that are built on very strong premises, characters, and themes. Ultimately, structure provides the connective tissue that brings all of the key ingredients of a great screenplay together, and without the right structural mechanisms it's difficult to create work that is greater than the sum of it's parts.

In this episode, Noam discusses the concept of strucutre from a top level, outlining why it is especially critical for micro-budget filmmakers that need to make the most out of their limited resources. He also provides 3 individivual examplles of unique story structures that can help filmmakers without much (or any) budget to ensure that their work is as original and engaging as possible.

For more content like this visit www.noamkroll.com

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One of the most universal struggles for filmmakers is knowing how and when to quit working at a day job. Making indepdnent films requires a ton of time and flexibility when it comes to scheduling, and many filmmakers believe that their current work-life setup is preventing them from having the time they need to reach their goals.

Over the course of this episode, Noam dives deep into the idea of leaving a stable career to pursue filmmaking full time, and explores a number of key questions that all filmmakers should ask themselves when making the leap. These questions are intended to guide filmmakers to wholly understand what the next logical step in their career should be, and from a top level standpoint, whether or not leaving their day jobs is in fact even the right choice.

For more content like this visit www.noamkroll.com

 

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Cinema lenses are one of the most crucial tools in any filmmaker's toolkit, yet many filmmakers have a limited knowledge of how glass will affect their image from both a creative and technical standpoint.

In this episode, Noam interviews Ryan Avery - the founder of Veydra lenses - who designed one of the most sought after lens kits for independent filmmakers: The Veydra Mini Primes.

Over the course of this interview, Ryan details exactly what goes into designing and developing high quality cinema glass, what optical qualities to look for when purchasing lenses, the future of lens technology, and much much more.

Learn more about Ryan's businesses here:

https://www.veydra.com

https://lensfinder.com

And for more content like this visit http://www.noamkroll.com

 

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